FAQs

Q?

Why are grooming service prices not listed?

A.

Service prices are not listed because prices vary depending on factors such as:

  • coat type & length
  • condition of coat
  • type of haircut
  • behavior
  • special handling

Q?

Do I need to book an appointment in advance?

A.

Reserve your appointment as soon as possible in order to get the day & time that is best for you. Weekends & Holiday months fill up quickly.

Q?

What info is needed for my 1st appointment?

A.

We require rabies vaccination records as required by state law, and our new customer form completed which we can give you or you can print it from our website & fill out in advance.

Q?

How long will the grooming service take?

A.

Dogs

  • baths typically take 1-2 hrs, express appointments typically take 1 hr
  • with a trim typically it takes 2-3 hrs, express appointments typically take 1-2 hrs
  • full haircuts typically take 2-4 hrs, express appointments typically take 1 1/2 - 2 1/2 hrs

Cats

  • baths typically take 1-3 hrs
  • with mat removal typically takes 2-4 hrs

Q?

Will my pet be kenneled before/after the groom?

A.

Pets are cared for in our stainless steel kennels with a blanket for comfort. We try to keep kennel time to a minimum & check on your pet frequently.

Q?

Do you use muzzles?

A.

Muzzling does not harm your pet and protects both your pet and the groomer. In some cases, muzzling may even calm a stressed pet, allowing the grooming process to continue. We do not muzzle unless your pet gives us reason to. Other methods are used to calm your pet, muzzling is a last resort.

Q?

Can I stay and watch my pet being groomed?

A.

We prefer pet parents do not stay during the groom because it can be very distracting for your pet & make grooming much more difficult.

Q?

How can I learn to best maintain my pet’s style between groomings?

A.

Please feel free to ask us any questions on how to maintain your pet, also you can learn more about the different tools and products and what they do on our Products page.

Q?

How often should I groom my pet?

A.

We recommend your pet at the least have a bath with nail trim & brush out every 4 to 6 weeks. We offer frequent grooming discounts!

Q?

What are the frequent grooming discounts?

A.

  • Every time you come in within 6 weeks of your pet's last groom you get a mark on your file. After 5 marks you get 50% off your next groom.
  • When you come in within 6 weeks of your pet's last groom you get 5% off your pet's groom excluding added services.
  • When you come in within 4 weeks of your pet's last groom you get 5% off your pet's groom excluding added services, and free teethbrushing.

Q?

What about mats?

A.

Matting is a very serious problem for pets. Mats left in a pet's coat only grow tighter, and can damage the pets skin, or even tear it open. Matting is very uncomfortable and even painful. Mats are often deceptive, hiding in areas that don't get much visual attention from owners such as the belly, under the tail, in the armpit area, and behind the ears. If you are not on a regular combing regimen with your pet, you may be unaware of the secret mats. These mats can trap moisture, urine, and fecal matter tightly against your pet's skin, allowing mold, fungus, or bacteria to grow, causing skin irritations that can be very uncomfortable for your pet.

Q?

I brush my pet, why is he matted?

A.

Matting is caused by a number of things.

1. Improper brushing. There is a right way and a wrong way to brush certain types of coats, as well as the correct tools to use. Try the internet or a breed specific book for starters, or your Groomer or stylist will be happy to show you how to brush and the proper tools to use on your pet. 

2. Bathing: If you bathe your pet at home, no matter what product you use, if the hair is not COMPLETELY COMBED OUT before and after bathing, any mats or tangles can be worsened by the wet/dry process. 

3. Shedding: "Nonshedding" breeds such as poodles and shitzus really do shed, however, the dead hair gets tangled up with the live coat, and if not brushed out regularly, it will eventually form mats.

Q?

Why does my pet’s hair get matted so quickly?

A.

The truth is if you want a longer hair style you have to comb your pet at least once every day or every other day. Just imagine not brushing your own hair for 1-3 months - your pet's hair is not different.

Q?

My pet has a lot of mats, is it necessary to shave them out?

A.

It depends on the severity of the matting. Minor mats can sometimes be worked out, but many times shaving down is necessary. Your groomer will try to leave the coat as long as possible, but if the mats are very tight, shaving may be the only option. Remember, it grows back, and your pet will feel better!

Severe mats can cause skin irritations and hide other conditions such as hot spots, dermatitis, sebborrhea, cuts, scrapes, sores, and redness. It is not unusual to encounter these problems when the coat is shaved from a badly matted pet and it is definitely in your pets best interest to address them.

Q?

My dog’s mats require a shavedown, what can I expect?

A.

Pets with matted coats need extra time and attention during grooming. We use extreme care when removing a badly matted coat, but there are risks involved. Some of those risks include nicks, cuts, or abrasions due to warts, moles, and skin trapped in the mats. After effects of mat removal can include itchiness, skin redness, self-inflicted irritation, and failure of the hair to regrow in double-coated breeds. Shaved pets are also more at risk of sunburn and should be protected from the sun until the hair has grown sufficiently to protect the skin. In some cases, brief behavioral changes may be seen, but the vast majority of matted pets show immense relief and happiness after removal of a matted coat.

Q?

What can I do to prevent matting?

A.

Prevention is by far the best defense against matting by scheduling regular grooming appointments, and combing your pet at home. We are always happy to demonstrate proper combing techniques for at home as well.

Q?

What can you do for my senior pet / pet with medical problem?

A.

Grooming procedures can sometimes be stressful, especially to a senior pet or a pet with a health condition.  Grooming can expose hidden medical conditions or aggravate existing ones.  Because these pets have a greater chance of injury, they will be groomed for cleanliness and comfort, in styles that will not add to their stress. 

Q?

Why don’t you do styled haircuts for cats?

A.

We only do mat removal haircuts for cats because cats need their coat for protection (ADD TO THIS) and cats have very thin, stretchy skin which greatly increases their risk of injury during shaving. Also we feel the grooming process is already a stressful one for cats & it is unfair to put them through anything more than is necessary.

Q?

Why can’t my cat have a flea bath?

A.

Flea repellent products labelled as ‘natural’ may still be toxic to your pet. The chemical d’Limonene, derived from citrus peels and found in many natural anti-flea products, can be highly toxic to cats. Flea sprays and dips which contain “all natural Pyrethrin” can be toxic to some pets, and Pyrethroids , synthetic derivatives of pyrethrins, expose your pet to more chemicals.

Flea control formulations which use essential oils can be particularly hazardous to cats. Essential oils are absorbed rapidly into their skin and enter the bloodstream, and because cats do not efficiently metabolize essential oils, exposure can build to toxic levels. And while there may be no initial adverse reaction, the effects of essential oils can be cumulative and manifest themselves at a later date. Other natural ingredients known to cause allergic reactions or have toxic effects in some animals include Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and Pennyroyal oil.

However we can allow our regular cat-safe pet shampoo to sit for extra time on your cat to smother the fleas & sell Frontline drops that can be applied to your cat to kill & prevent fleas.

Q?

Why are my cat’s nails not cut all the way to the end of the quick?

A.

Because whether or not your cat is an indoor cat or not they still require their nails to climb, catch prey, and defend themselves.